https://doi.org/10.24928/2019/0216.

Changing Behaviors Upstream to Achieve Expected Outcomes

Sulyn Gomez1, Raymond Huynh2, Paz Arroyo3, Glenn Ballard4, Iris Tommelein5 & Patricia Tillmann6

1PhD Student, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712, USA, +1 765 775-6583, sulyn@berkeley.edu
2Senior Project Engineer, Quality Champion, DPR Construction, San Francisco, CA 94111, USA, +1 415 528-1045, rhuynh28@gmail.com
3Quality Leader, Quality Corporate Team, DPR Construction, San Francisco, CA 94111, USA, +1 510 520-6238, paza@dpr.com
4Research Director, Civil and Envir. Engrg. Dept., Project Production Systems Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712, USA, +1 415 710-5531, gballard@berkeley.edu
5Professor, Civil and Envir. Engrg. Dept., Director of the Project Production Systems Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712, USA, +1 510 643-8678, tommelein@berkeley.edu
6Senior Lean Manager, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94103, USA, +1 415 279-9102, patricia.andretillmann@ucsf.edu

Abstract

A behavior-based approach to quality has been proposed to highlight the impact that upstream behaviors have on the overall outcomes of construction projects. The focus of this pioneering approach is first to understand that certain behaviors lead to conversations in which expectations are clearly identified and understood by the different project participants, and then to set measurable acceptance criteria so that the final result can be compared with what was agreed. Previous research has described the approach and provided positive results in satisfying client’s expectations, but the process to achieve such outcomes has not been captured. This paper captures the implementation of this behavior-based quality (BBQ) approach to quality management, that has as its main goal to have no surprises, zero rework, and to improve delivery of value to all the project participants engaged at any point of a construction project. Construction projects are to be planned first for quality to fully understand expectations of what the team should build, then for safety to identify any potential risks associated with the processes to build the agreed work and define how tasks will be built in a safe manner, and then for production to secure flow and an adequate use of resources.

Keywords

Quality, behavior-based quality (BBQ), behavior, distinguishing features of work (DFOW), measurable acceptance criteria (MAC).

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Reference

Gomez, S. , Huynh, R. , Arroyo, P. , Ballard, G. , Tommelein, I. & Tillmann, P. 2019, 'Changing Behaviors Upstream to Achieve Expected Outcomes' In:, Proc. 27th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction (IGLC). Dublin, Ireland, 3-5 Jul 2019. pp 13-24

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