Reducing Fit-Out Time in a Netherlands Housing Project

Ype Cuperus1, Hans Wamelink2 & Glenn Resodihardjo3

1Assistant Professor Architectural Engineering, Department Building Technology, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Phone +31 15 278 4646, y.j.cuperus@tudelft.nl
2Professor Design and Construction Management, Department Real Estate and Housing, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Phone +31 15 278 4159, j.w.f.wamelink@tudelft.nl
3Master Candidate Design and Construction Management, Department Real Estate and Housing, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Phone +31 6 2452 2804, glennresodihardjo@casema.nl

Abstract

In the Netherlands the fit-out time of newly built row houses in lots of 50 to 100 units can be eleven weeks. On such projects a large number of subcontractors is common (40 to 50) and this adds to the complexity of the construction process. This paper describes key data of a standard fit-out procedure of a project of 82 dwellings, with an average fit out time of 35 days. Two dwellings were singled out for a pilot project with a target fit-out time of two weeks. This project in general provided for many consumer options; the two dwellings represent different levels of equipment and finishing. In a Last PlannerTM System inspired planning session the planned fit-out time was reduced to two weeks. For this pilot the subcontractors created ad hoc team combinations that worked as multi skilled teams in order to reduce the number of decision-making points. Materials were bundled per unit per day. The time planning unit used was two hours. The real fit-out processes are described as cases, with special attention to external interferences and internal non-value adding activities. The fit-out time was reduced from 35 to 11 and 19 days for the respective dwellings. Although there were many hitches in the process caused by the different way of working the pilot demonstrated that the fit-out time per dwelling could be reduced considerably. The tradesmen from different subcontractors were asked to collaborate crossing the traditional disciplinary borders, this was experienced as positive. The main contractor was positive about planning the work on two-hour time slots and has decided to do a second test with a larger number of units.

Keywords

Last Planner System, Cycle time, Multi-skilled teams, House building

Files

Reference

Cuperus, Y. , Wamelink, H. & Resodihardjo, G. 2010, 'Reducing Fit-Out Time in a Netherlands Housing Project' In:, Walsh, K. & Alves, T., 18th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction. Haifa, Israel, 14-16 Jul 2010. pp 326-333

Download: BibTeX | RIS Format