Where Lean Construction and Value Management Meet

Muktari M. Musa1, Christine Pasquire2 & Alan Hurst3

1PhD Research Student, Centre for Lean Projects, School of Architecture, Design and Built Environment, Nottingham Trent University, UK, +44(0)7990412973 muktari.musa2012@my.ntu.ac.uk
2Professor, School of Architecture, Design and Built Environment, and Director Centre for Lean Projects, Nottingham Trent University, UK, +44(0) 115 848 2095 christine.pasquire@ntu.ac.uk
3Senior Lecturer, School of Architecture, Design and Built Environment, Projects, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG1 4BU, UK, +44(0) 115 848 2878 alan.hurst@ntu.ac.uk

Abstract

The lean construction (LC) community’s key vision and goal is to provide value, yet they are increasingly challenged with understanding and dealing with the concept of value, with reports that value is one of the weakest points. Regardless of the previous studies and contributions already made on the concept of value in LC, the absence of a consistent understanding of value has resulted in misperceptions and indistinct boundaries with other construction value-related disciplines. Without a consistent understanding of value, the full potential of applying value-established concepts will not occur. Thus, the study of different concepts in construction will open new opportunities to deliver value in the future. Literature reviewed only revealed a small number of interdisciplinary comparisons of Lean manufacturing and LC with value management (VM)/value engineering (VE) on value. Secondary data was used to present an in-depth comparison of the principal points of the current practice and theories of LC and VM, which are seen as ways to improve the delivery of value to clients and building users. The study revealed a range of similarities at a high level, which could easily point to an early conclusion that LC and VM are interchangeable, leading to the same goal of value delivery and shared misapplication of cost reduction techniques. However, a more detailed examination indicates significant differences in the philosophy and scope in different areas, including project timing, practitioner duties, and areas of practice which could complement each other. Also the study identified that LC is a broader philosophy which covers more aspects than VM, it is evident that LC has advanced over the years towards discussions on the concept of value. The current work in LC on value relies less on other construction value-related disciplines such as VM, VE and partnering. Furthermore, LC literature still views value as a confusing concept associated with different interpretations, forming the basisof its understanding. The study established that value plays a central role in both LC and VM. Their combination could offer great synergy regarding the concept of value.

Keywords

Lean Construction, Value Management, Value, Value-related disciplines, Integration

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Reference

Musa, M.M. , Pasquire, C. & Hurst, A. 2016, 'Where Lean Construction and Value Management Meet' In:, 24th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction. Boston, USA, 20-22 Jul 2016.

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